[WSMDiscuss] Haitians demand U.S. stay out and allow domestic solution / intervention would be catastrophic for the Haitian people

Brian brian at radicalroad.com
Thu Oct 20 20:54:45 CEST 2022


See pasted below three valuable perspectives on the current situation in Haïti. 

~ Brian
________________ 

“We are seeing people really protesting on the street for the right to [a] sovereign solution to the issues that are happening, and they are saying 'no' to an armed invasion from the international community,” says Guerline Jozef, executive director of the Haitian Bridge Alliance.

https://www.democracynow.org/2022/10/19/imported_gang_violence_devastates_hait <https://www.democracynow.org/2022/10/19/imported_gang_violence_devastates_hait>
> Haitians Protest Economic Crisis & Gang Violence, Demand U.S. Stay Out and Allow Domestic Solution
> 
| Democracy Now! | October 19, 2022
> 
> Protests are growing in Port-au-Prince as thousands fill the streets to demand the U.S.-backed Prime Minister Ariel Henry resign after he announced he would raise fuel prices amid an already dire humanitarian crisis. Countries, including the U.S. and Canada, have sent military equipment to assist the Haitian police in cracking down on the unrest, and the U.S. has been pushing the United Nations Security Council to authorize a security mission, spurring more protests against foreign intervention.
> 
> “We are seeing people really protesting on the street for the right to [a] sovereign solution to the issues that are happening, and they are saying 'no' to an armed invasion from the international community,” says Guerline Jozef, executive director of the Haitian Bridge Alliance.
> 
> AMY GOODMAN: We begin today’s show looking at the crisis in Haiti, where protesters continue to demand the resignation of the U.S.-backed Prime Minister Ariel Henry and against the deployment of international troops to Haiti amidst a growing humanitarian crisis. A blockade of a key port in Port-au-Prince, the capital, by gangs has led to a critical shortage of fuel, food and water for millions of people.
> 
> Meanwhile, Haiti is fighting a new outbreak of cholera. On Monday, U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres called for a, quote, “armed action” to reopen the port.
> 
> SECRETARY-GENERAL ANTÓNIO GUTERRES: It’s an absolutely nightmarish situation for the population of Haiti, especially Port-au-Prince. … I believe that we need not only to strengthen the police, strengthening it with training, with equipment, with a number of other measures, but that in the present circumstances we need an armed action to release the port and to allow for a humanitarian corridor to be established.
> 
> AMY GOODMAN: On Monday, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Linda Thomas-Greenfield pushed for the U.N. Security Council to authorize a non-U.N. international security mission to go to Haiti.
> 
> LINDA THOMAS-GREENFIELD: The second resolution we’re working on would authorize a non-U.N. international security assistance mission to help improve the security situation and enable the flow of desperately needed humanitarian aid.
> 
> AMY GOODMAN: But in the streets of Haiti, many protesters have condemned the United States for pushing to intervene again in Haiti. Protesters are also demanding the resignation of Ariel Henry, who has ruled since the assassination of Jovenel Moïse on July 7, 2021. This is former Haitian senator and presidential candidate Moïse Jean-Charles.
> 
> MOÏSE JEAN-CHARLES: [translated] Freedom. We are not in the states of the United States. We are not provinces of the United States. We are a country. We are a republic. They cannot give us orders. This time, we do not need them. If Ariel Henry does not resign and the bank officials don’t change their minds, we will make a revolution in the country.
> 
> AMY GOODMAN: We’re joined now by Guerline Jozef. She is co-founder and executive director of Haitian Bridge Alliance, which advocates for humanitarian assistance to Haitians and other Black immigrants from the Caribbean and Africa. Today she’s joining us from Mexico City, where she’s looking into the impacts of the Title 42 pandemic, Trump-era policy that’s been used to block at least 2 million migrants, including tens of thousands of Haitians, from applying for asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border. The Biden administration recently expanded Title 42 to begin expelling Venezuelan nationals.
> 
> Guerline Jozef, welcome back to Democracy Now! Before we move to what’s happening at the border, let’s talk about what’s happening in Haiti right now. You have the reports that chaos is engulfing the country, that it’s become so total, the social fabric is so torn, that the country is on the verge of collapse. And then you have the U.N. secretary-general calling for military action. Can you respond to the protests and the response?
> 
> GUERLINE JOZEF: Good morning, Amy. Thank you so much for having us.
> 
> What we are seeing in Haiti right now is extremely painful as a Haitian woman, as a Haitian American woman, to see how the country has been dipping into this abyss. And we have been in communications with civil societies in Haiti to understand what is needed on the ground. And they are telling us they need a Haitian-led solution in order for the country to get out of where we are right now — as you mentioned, Amy, rampant violence, gang violence, political turmoil, assassination of the president still not answered.
> 
> And we are seeing people really protesting on the street for the right to sovereign — a solution to the issues that are happening. And they are saying no to an invasion, no to armed invasion from the international community, because every time there is the so-called help invasion, that people go to Haiti, results in chaos. You also mentioned the cholera pandemic that is in the rise right now. And that itself is a result of the U.N. being in Haiti after the earthquake. So, we are seeing and hearing, and we are taking the time to understand what Haiti needs right now in how we move forward.
> 
> JUAN GONZÁLEZ: And, Guerline Jozef, I wanted to ask you — we keep hearing about this gang violence that is rampant throughout Haiti. But there are some Haitians in the U.S., as well as other radicals and socialists here in this country, who say that all these gangs are not alike, that the — for instance, that the FRG9, the Revolutionary Forces of the G9 Family, led by Jimmy Chérizier, are much more political, and they’re the ones that are dealing with this blockade of the port, whereas other gangs, like the GPEP, are actually part of — work with the Ariel Henry government and the police, and the United States seems to be more focused on FRG9. Could you talk about whether there are differences between these gangs? And what’s your sense of how the narrative is being shaped here in the U.S.?
> 
> GUERLINE JOZEF: Absolutely. One thing I want to clarify is the fact that this gang pandemic, this gang phenomenon, is not native to Haiti. It’s imported to Haiti. We are not used to this type of violence when it comes to gangs. This is a new system that is being put in place, or that has been put in place, to destabilize the country. I do not know who is supporting which gang. I do not know which activities are being supported either by outside sources or people within the government.
> 
> But what we are seeing right now is that people are fearful. We are seeing entire neighborhoods being displaced, in Martissant, in Croix-des-Bouquets, in Pétion-Ville, where we never had any violence before, that we are seeing all places in the country dealing with gang violence. And again, it is imperative that we understand the narrative that’s being shared, is that Haiti has never had to deal with this level of gang violence. This is new. This is backed by many different other outside forces.
> 
> And we must understand that we have to come to a resolve where we rid the country of violence, so people don’t have to flee. Right now we are seeing people fleeing by boat, either going to Puerto Rico, to the Bahamas, to Miami. And they are dying on the way here. We are seeing people fleeing from Haiti, making their way to the border in Mexico, because they cannot be at home. We are seeing the political turmoil, the gang violence, that are being financed or supported by whomever, that are creating a space where people cannot survive.
> 
> That is why when we speak to civil societies in Haiti, we understand that in order for us to move forward, there must be sustainability. There must be proper school. There must be proper hospital. There must be — the agriculture needs to be revived, in order for people to be able to be safe at home and not have to flee.
> 
> JUAN GONZÁLEZ: Can you talk about the Montana Accords, what they are, and the group that developed them following the assassination of Haiti’s former president in 2021?
> 
> GUERLINE JOZEF: I am not an expert of the Montana Accord, but what we understand is that over 500 groups, civil societies, political groups, have come together to come up with a solution that is led by Haitians to be able to find a way moving forward. What we understand from the Montana Accord, it is the only alternative we have right now to really getting ourselves out of the political turmoil, possibly having a safe transition where then we can move to a better space in Haiti. So, again, I am not an expert in the Montana Accord, but from understanding and speaking with many different groups and people who were involved, it seems to be a good alternative in order to move forward.
> 
> But what we are seeing is that there’s no real engagement between the Montana Accord parties, the international communities, people who wants to support Haiti and wants to be able to get a way out of the issues we are dealing right now. So we are calling on the international community, on the U.S. and Canada, to not side with one — with the political people in power, but to make sure that they are including the civil societies, the people of Haiti, who are able to take their future in hand and see how we can work together. At this point, we believe that Haiti needs support. Haiti needs to be stabilized. Haiti needs to have a sustainable ecosystem, so that people can lift, people can prosper — not just survive, but thrive.
> 
> ________
> "A further such intervention in the name of ‘human rights’ would only affirm the neocolonial system now managed by Ariel Henry and would be catastrophic for the Haitian people, whose movement forward is being blocked by gangs created <https://mronline.org/2021/07/20/haitian-ruling-families-create-and-kill-monsters/> and promoted behind the scenes by the Haitian oligarchy, supported by the Core Group, and armed by weapons from <https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-08-17/us-sees-surge-in-haitian-gangs-smuggling-guns-from-florida> the United States.
> 

> "Another invasion, whether by US and Canadian troops or by UN peacekeeping forces, will only deepen the crisis. Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, the International Peoples’ Assembly <https://ipa-aip.org/>, ALBA Movements <https://albamovimientos.net/>, and the Plateforme Haïtienne de Plaidoyer pour un Développement Alternatif <http://www.papda.org/> (‘Haitian Advocacy Platform for Alternative Development’ or PAPDA) have produced a red alert on the current situation in Haiti…".
> 

https://thetricontinental.org/newsletterissue/haiti-insurrection-military-intervention/ <https://thetricontinental.org/newsletterissue/haiti-insurrection-military-intervention/>
> The Last Thing Haiti Needs Is Another Military Intervention
> 
> Vijay Prashad | Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research <https://thetricontinental.org/>  | October 20, 2022
> 
> At the United Nations General Assembly on 24 September 2022, Haiti’s Foreign Minister Jean Victor Geneus admitted that his country faces a serious crisis, which he said <https://news.un.org/en/story/2022/09/1127921> ‘can only be solved with the effective support of our partners’. To many close observers of the situation unfolding in Haiti, the phrase ‘effective support’ sounded like Geneus was signalling that another military intervention by Western powers was imminent.
> 
> Indeed, two days prior to Geneus’s comments, The Washington Post published an editorial on the situation in Haiti in which it called <https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2022/09/22/haiti-violence-how-to-help/> for ‘muscular action by outside actors’. On 15 October, the United States and Canada issued a joint statement <https://www.state.gov/joint-statement-united-states-and-canada-coordinate-delivery-of-haitian-national-police-hnp-equipment/> announcing that they had sent military aircraft to Haiti to deliver weapons to Haitian security services. That same day, the United States submitted a draft resolution <https://www.stripes.com/theaters/americas/2022-10-15/us-support-sending-multinational-force-haiti-7699152.html> to the UN Security Council calling for the ‘immediate deployment of a multinational rapid action force’ into Haiti.
> 
> Ever since the Haitian Revolution won independence from France in 1804, Haiti has faced successive waves of invasions, including a two-decade-long US occupation <https://2001-2009.state.gov/r/pa/ho/time/wwi/88275.htm> from 1915 to 1934, a US-backed dictatorship <https://www.coha.org/human-rights-in-haiti/> from 1957 to 1986, two Western-backed coups <https://haitisolidarity.net/in-the-news/the-final-chapter-has-still-not-been-written-remembering-the-2004-coup-in-haiti/> against the progressive former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide in 1991 and 2004, and a UN military intervention <https://peacekeeping.un.org/en/mission/minustah> from 2004 to 2017.
> 
> These invasions have prevented Haiti from securing its sovereignty and have prevented its people from building dignified lives. Another invasion, whether by US and Canadian troops or by UN peacekeeping forces, will only deepen the crisis. Tricontinental: Institute for Social Research, the International Peoples’ Assembly <https://ipa-aip.org/>, ALBA Movements <https://albamovimientos.net/>, and the Plateforme Haïtienne de Plaidoyer pour un Développement Alternatif <http://www.papda.org/> (‘Haitian Advocacy Platform for Alternative Development’ or PAPDA) have produced a red alert on the current situation in Haiti, which can be found below and downloaded as a PDF. <https://thetricontinental.org/wp-content/uploads/2022/10/20221019_Red-Alert-16_EN_Web.pdf>
>  <https://thetricontinental.org/red-alert-16-hai%E2%80%A6ary-intervention>
> What is happening in Haiti?
> 
> A popular insurrection has unfolded in Haiti throughout 2022. These protests are the continuation of a cycle of resistance that began in 2016 in response to a social crisis developed by the coups in 1991 and 2004, the earthquake in 2010, and Hurricane Matthew in 2016. For more than a century, any attempt by the Haitian people to exit the neocolonial system imposed by the US military occupation (1915–34) has been met with military and economic interventions to preserve it. The structures of domination and exploitation established by that system have impoverished the Haitian people, with most of the population having no access to drinking water, health care, education, or decent housing. Of Haiti’s 11.4 million people, 4.6 million are food insecure <https://news.un.org/fr/story/2022/03/1116792> and 70% are unemployed <https://www.cath.ch/newsf/haiti-caritas-suisse-consolide-son-action-140492/>.
> 
> The Haitian Creole word dechoukaj or ‘uprooting’ – which was first used <https://www.nytimes.com/2010/02/07/opinion/07wilentz.html> in the pro-democracy movements of 1986 that fought against the US-backed dictatorship – has come to define <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhhrnjIU0Xo> the current protests. The government of Haiti, led by acting Prime Minister and President Ariel Henry, raised fuel prices during this crisis, which provoked a protest from the trade unions and deepened the movement.
> 
> Henry was installed <https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2021/7/17/core-group-urges-haiti-designated-pm-to-form-a-government> to his post in 2021 by the ‘Core Group <https://socialism.com/statement/core-group-and-imperialism-out-of-haiti/>’ (made up of six countries and led by the US, the European Union, the UN, and the Organisation of American States) after the murder of the unpopular president Jovenel Moïse. Although still unsolved, it is clear <https://theintercept.com/2021/07/26/colombian-mercenaries-haiti-jovenel-moise-assassination/> that Moïse was killed by a conspiracy that included the ruling party, drug trafficking gangs, Colombian mercenaries, and US intelligence services. The UN’s Helen La Lime told <https://binuh.unmissions.org/en/security-council-session-united-nations-integrated-office-haiti-binuh-18-february-2022> the Security Council in February that the national investigation into Moïse’s murder had stalled, a situation that has fuelled rumours and exacerbated both suspicion and mistrust within the country.
> 
> How have the forces of neocolonialism reacted?
> 
> The United States and Canada are now arming <https://www.state.gov/joint-statement-united-states-and-canada-coordinate-delivery-of-haitian-national-police-hnp-equipment/> Henry’s illegitimate government and planning military intervention in Haiti. On 15 October, the US submitted a draft resolution <https://www.stripes.com/theaters/americas/2022-10-15/us-support-sending-multinational-force-haiti-7699152.html> to the United Nations Security Council calling for the ‘immediate deployment of a multinational rapid action force’ in the country. This would be the latest chapter in over two centuries of destructive intervention by Western countries in Haiti. Since the 1804 Haitian Revolution, the forces of imperialism (including slave owners) have intervened militarily and economically against people’s movements seeking to end the neocolonial system. Most recently, these forces entered the country under the auspices of the United Nations via the UN Stabilisation Mission in Haiti (MINUSTAH), which was active from 2004 to 2017. A further such intervention in the name of ‘human rights’ would only affirm the neocolonial system now managed by Ariel Henry and would be catastrophic for the Haitian people, whose movement forward is being blocked by gangs created <https://mronline.org/2021/07/20/haitian-ruling-families-create-and-kill-monsters/> and promoted behind the scenes by the Haitian oligarchy, supported by the Core Group, and armed by weapons from <https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2022-08-17/us-sees-surge-in-haitian-gangs-smuggling-guns-from-florida> the United States.
> 
> How can the world stand in solidarity with Haiti?
> 
> Haiti’s crisis can only be solved by the Haitian people, but they must be accompanied by the immense force of international solidarity. The world can look to the examples demonstrated by the Cuban Medical Brigade <https://www.haitilibre.com/en/news-35493-haiti-health-the-cuban-brigade-celebrates-23-years-of-care-in-haiti.html>, which first went to Haiti in 1998; by the Via Campesina/ALBA Movimientos brigade, which has worked with popular movements on reforestation and popular education since 2009; and by the assistance <https://mppre.gob.ve/2021/08/31/venezuela-haiti-strengthen-cooperation-solidarity-based-ties/> provided by the Venezuelan government, which includes discounted oil. It is imperative for those standing in solidarity with Haiti to demand, at a minimum:
> 
that France and the United States provide reparations for the theft of Haitian wealth since 1804, including the return <https://haitiliberte.com/how-the-u-s-came-to-dominate-haiti-seizing-the-gold/> of the gold stolen by the US in 1914. France alone owes <https://lenouvelliste.com/article/211316/au-minimum-la-france-devrait-rembourser-plus-de-28-milliards-de-dollars-americains-a-haiti-aujourdhui-soutient-le-celebre-economiste-francais-thomas-piketty> Haiti at least $28 billion.
that the United States return <https://haitirectoverso.blogspot.com/2015/10/la-navase-lile-haitienne-occupee-par.html> Navassa Island to Haiti.
that the United Nations pay <https://www.humanrightspulse.com/mastercontentblog/haitian-court-delivers-landmark-petit-minustah-decision-new-light-shed-on-decades-of-un-peacekeeper-sexual-abuse> for the crimes committed by MINUSTAH, whose forces killed tens of thousands of Haitians, raped untold numbers of women, and introduced cholera <https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC9105971/> into the country.
that the Haitian people be permitted to build their own sovereign, dignified, and just political and economic framework and to create education and health systems that can meet the people’s real needs.
that all progressive forces oppose the military invasion of Haiti.
> The common sense demands in this red alert do not require much elaboration, but they do need to be amplified.
> 
> Western countries will talk about this new military intervention with phrases such as ‘restoring democracy’ and ‘defending human rights’. The terms ‘democracy’ and ‘human rights’ are demeaned in these instances. This was on display at the UN General Assembly in September, when US President Joe Biden said <https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/speeches-remarks/2022/09/21/remarks-by-president-biden-before-the-77th-session-of-the-united-nations-general-assembly/> that his government continues ‘to stand with our neighbour in Haiti’. The emptiness of these words is revealed in a new Amnesty International report <https://www.amnesty.org/en/latest/news/2022/09/usa-torture-haitian-asylum-seekers-anti-black-racism/> that documents the racist abuse faced by Haitian asylum seekers in the United States. The US and the Core Group might stand with people like Ariel Henry and the Haitian oligarchy, but they do not stand with the Haitian people, including those who have fled to the United States.
> 
> In 1957, the Haitian communist novelist Jacques-Stéphen Alexis published a letter to his country titled La belle amour humaine (‘Beautiful Human Love’). ‘I don’t think that the triumph of morality can happen by itself without the actions of humans’, Alexis wrote <http://petitspointscardinaux.net/compagnes-compagnons/jacques-stephen-alexis/article/la-belle-amour-humaine-1957?fbclid=IwAR15KeCIFjV41yv1jR-eyEBqSvVduPqU7hcXnBek51N6DdMgrzunCJ5EPhI>.
> 
> A descendent of Jean-Jacques Dessalines, one of the revolutionaries that overthrew French rule in 1804, Alexis wrote novels to uplift the human spirit, a profound contribution to the Battle of Emotions <https://thetricontinental.org/dossier-ten-theses-on-marxism-and-decolonisation/> in his country. In 1959, Alexis founded the Parti pour l’Entente Nationale (‘People’s Consensus Party’). On 2 June 1960, Alexis wrote to the US-backed dictator François ‘Papa Doc’ Duvalier to inform him that both he and his country would overcome the violence of the dictatorship.
> 
> ‘As a man and as a citizen’, Alexis wrote, ‘it is inescapable to feel the inexorable march of the terrible disease, this slow death, which each day leads our people to the cemetery of nations like wounded pachyderms to the necropolis of elephants’. This march can only be halted by the people. Alexis was forced into exile in Moscow, where he participated in a meeting of international communist parties. When he arrived back in Haiti in April 1961, he was abducted in Môle-Saint-Nicolas and killed by the dictatorship shortly thereafter. In his letter to Duvalier, Alexis echoed, ‘we are the children of the future’.
> 
> __________________
> 
> https://theintercept.com/2022/10/19/haiti-armed-intervention-dan-foote-interview/ <https://theintercept.com/2022/10/19/haiti-armed-intervention-dan-foote-interview/?utm_medium=email&utm_source=The%20Intercept%20Newsletter>Biden’s Former Haitian Envoy Slams White House Plan for Armed Intervention
> 
> “We’re going to have a civil uprising in Haiti similar to 1915,” said former Ambassador Dan Foote.
> 
> Ryan Grim <applewebdata://6C4CD14A-E6DD-426A-8838-8D20FACB0E92/staff/ryangrim/>, The Intercept, October 19 2022
> If the U.S. moves forward with a U.N.-proposed plan to send armed forces into Haiti, the Biden administration’s former envoy to Haiti warned, the result will be a predictable catastrophe.
> 
> Ambassador Dan Foote resigned last fall in protest <https://theintercept.com/2021/10/07/haiti-migrants-daniel-foote/> of U.S. deportation policy, which continues to return planeloads of Haitian migrants to dangerous conditions without giving them a serious opportunity to apply for asylum. In his resignation letter, he also condemned the U.S. for its support of the extra-legal, de facto Prime Minister Ariel Henry, who has been credibly linked <https://www.cnn.com/2022/02/08/americas/haiti-assassination-investigation-prime-minister-intl-cmd-latam/index.html> to the assassination <https://theintercept.com/2021/07/26/colombian-mercenaries-haiti-jovenel-moise-assassination/> of President Jovenel Moïse in July 2021, and has fired multiple prosecutors <https://www.reuters.com/world/americas/haiti-chief-prosecutor-calls-pm-be-charged-presidents-killing-2021-09-14/> probing the crime.
> 
> In recent weeks, Haiti has erupted in protests against deteriorating economic conditions. In September, Henry cut fuel subsidies, sending costs flying and people into the streets. Gangs responded by blockading a key fuel terminal, and in early October, Henry called <https://www.reuters.com/world/americas/haitis-pm-henry-calls-foreign-help-amid-gang-blockade-2022-10-06/> for international intervention. An outbreak of cholera, originally brought to the island <https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2016/dec/01/haiti-cholera-outbreak-stain-on-reputation-un-says> by a U.N. “peacekeeping” operation in the 2000s, is worsening as the fuel shortage limits clean water supplies.
> 
> U.N. Secretary-General António Guterres responded <https://www.pbs.org/newshour/world/thousands-protest-in-haiti-as-un-discusses-troop-request> to Henry’s call for intervention by encouraging an international armed force to deploy to Haiti. On Monday, Linda Thomas-Greenfield, U.S. representative to the United Nations, told the Security Council that the U.S. and Mexico would be proposing a resolution for a “carefully scoped non-U.N. mission led by a partner country with the deep and necessary experience required for such an effort to be effective.”
> 
> Foote said Biden’s increasingly interventionist posture toward Haiti, which was evident even last year, was behind his decision to resign. “The deportations were the straw that broke the camel’s back,” Foote said <https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UMATMmQiINo&t=956s>. “But the major reason I resigned is because I saw U.S policy moving in exactly this direction, toward intervention, which is, as Einstein said — and I’ll paraphrase — trying the same thing over and over again and expecting a different result is insanity. And in Haiti, each time the international community has intervened without Haitian and popular support, the situation is stabilized temporarily, and then it becomes much worse over time.”
> 
> An armed intervention would likely produce a short period of calm, he said, but would fall apart sooner or later. “It’s almost unfathomable that all Haitians are calling for a different solution, yet the U.S and the U.N and international [institutions] are blindly stumbling through with Ariel Henry,” he said.
> 
> Foote said that the Biden administration continues to support Henry in power because he has been amenable to accepting the deportations of migrants. “It’s gotta be because he has promised to be compliant,” he said, “but we’re going to have a civil uprising in Haiti similar to 1915, when we sent the Marines in for the first time and administered Haiti for almost 20 years. In 1915, Haiti was in a similar position, and they went up to the French Embassy at the time, or the legation, and they dragged the president — President [Jean Vilbrun Guillaume] Sam — out, and they tore him limb from limb on the streets. And I fear that you’re gonna see something similar with Ariel Henry or with a foreign force that’s sent in there to propagate his government and keep him in power.”
> 
> But the policy is circular and self-defeating, Foote argued. In exchange for the short-term political gain of alleviating the Haitian migration crisis at the U.S. border <https://theintercept.com/2021/10/01/haiti-migrants-texas-del-rio-border/> — a crisis driven by instability <https://theintercept.com/2019/10/22/haiti-tps-earthquake-displacement-camps/> and deepening poverty — the deportations are only increasing instability, thereby exacerbating the migration crisis. Mexico, but also Brazil and other South and Central American nations, have seen the number of refugees from Haiti soar amid surging prices and a deteriorating security situation.
> 
> “It’s self-perpetuating,” he said. “We’re looking at the immigration consequences daily. Haitians want to leave Haiti. If we were there, we’d do the same thing. It is unlivable there. So you’re going to see continued increased immigration demand, including in unsafe boats and crossing very dangerous places like the Darién [Gap] in Panama, etc.”
> 
> At the root of the bias toward intervention is blatant racism, Foote said.
> 

> “If they support U.N intervention, and we move forward with that, I’m heartbroken, frankly, because it’s not going to work,” he said. “It can restore stability temporarily, but it will not be sustainable. There’s no state in Haiti on which the people can hang their hat, and if the current illegitimate government holds elections, they won’t be acceptable by the Haitian people. If Ariel Henry is involved in any government that holds elections, you might as well not even hold them because the people won’t accept them, and we’ll continue to be in a place where they are governed by foreigners, basically. It goes back to our policy — unspoken U.S policy that’s been going on for 200-plus years, and I’ve heard this in hushed tones in the back quarters of the State Department: ‘What drives our Haiti policy is this unspoken belief that these dumb Black people can’t govern themselves.’”
> 

> Haitian civil society should have the opportunity to come up with their own solution, he said. “Let’s give the Haitians a chance to mess their own country up for once. I’ve seen us do it a number of times,” said Foote, adding that he was involved in the disastrous post-earthquake reconstruction effort.
> 

> “I know how not to fix Haiti. We’ve done it numerous times. Give them a chance to fix themselves. What’s the worst they can do? They can’t do any worse than the United States and the international community has done, and I guarantee you they’re going to do better because they know their country, and they’re gonna be bought into their own solutions — as opposed to being told what to do by white foreigners.”
> 
______________________

Blog: https://murphyslog.ca
Twitter:  @BrianKMurphy2 







-------------- next part --------------
An HTML attachment was scrubbed...
URL: <https://lists.openspaceforum.net/pipermail/wsm-discuss/attachments/20221020/07b8d226/attachment.htm>
-------------- next part --------------
A non-text attachment was scrubbed...
Name: 20220918_Red-Alert-16-Cards_EN_TT.jpeg
Type: image/jpeg
Size: 34243 bytes
Desc: not available
URL: <https://lists.openspaceforum.net/pipermail/wsm-discuss/attachments/20221020/07b8d226/attachment.jpeg>


More information about the WSM-Discuss mailing list